Peter Goldenthal, Ph.D., ABPP: Child, Adult, & Family Psychology

Selected Works by Dr. Goldenthal

Nonfiction
A parenting book providing answers to questions about sibling conflicts
Professional Book
This book presents the theory, concepts, and techniques of Contextual Therapy, a unique and powerful thereapeutic approach especially suited to helping children and adolescents.

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Therapy and the Human-Dog Bond

How to Listen and Whisper to Your Dog part 4

December 29, 2015

Tags: human dog bond, dog whisperer, listen, dog training

People who are about to purchase or adopt a puppy or adult dog are first of all looking for a dog who has a strong desire to connect with people in general and with one or two special people in particular. Some dogs like everybody they meet and readily form attachment bonds. Other dogs, especially those who have been abandoned or hurt, form attachments much more slowly.

A happy dog is truly unconditional love embodied. As long as your pup or adult dog has not been terribly traumatized and perhaps even if it has, you can create the kind of happy life that lets that unconditional love flow.

The bond between person and dog is often healing for person and dog alike. It can be healing for a pup who at the very least has been separated from its litter mates and parents at an earlier age than would have occurred naturally. And that’s the best scenario. Living conditions in puppy mills–they still exist–are miserable for both mother and offspring. Some puppies are adopted after being abandoned by the side of the road or in a cardboard box on a street corner.

These neglected and abandoned pups are just as capable of bonding as are pups who have a more pampered first several weeks. Before they can be the kind of happy dogs who can form close and reciprocal bonds, however, they need to be rehabilitated: nurtured, calmed, loved, fed regularly, played with, cuddled, petted.